A time course analysis of transcription response in yeast treated with rapamycin, a specific inhibitor of the TORC1 complex: impact on yeast growth

Comprehensive high-throughput analyses at the levels of mRNAs, proteins, and metabolites, and studies on gene expression patterns are required for systems biology studies of cell growth [4,26-29]. Although such comprehensive data sets are lacking, many studies have pointed to a central role for the target-of-rapamycin (TOR) signal transduction pathway in growth control. TOR is a serine/threonine kinase that has been conserved from yeasts to mammals; it integrates signals from nutrients or growth factors to regulate cell growth and cell-cycle progression coordinately. Although such comprehensive data sets are lacking, many studies have pointed to a central role for the target-of-rapamycin (TOR) signal transduction pathway in growth control. TOR is a serine/threonine kinase that has been conserved from yeasts to mammals; it integrates signals from nutrients or growth factors to regulate cell growth and cell-cycle progression coordinately. The effect of rapamycin were studied as follows: a culture growing at mid-exponential phase was divided into two. Rapamycin (200 ng/ml) was added to one half, and the drug's solvent to the other, as the control. Samples were taken at 0, 1, 2 and 4 h after treatment. Gene expression at the mRNA level was investigated by transcriptome analysis using Affymetrix hybridization arrays

This data is public data taken from the BII (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/bioinvindex/study.seam?studyId=BII-S-2)

SEEK ID: https://demo.fairdomhub.org/studies/4

Growth control of the eukaryote cell: a systems biology investigation into yeast

Projects: SysMO DB

Katy Wolstencroft

Experimentalists: Castrillo I Juan, Zeef A Leo, Stephen G Oliver

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Created: 16th Oct 2009 at 16:41

Last updated: 4th Nov 2011 at 11:06

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